Cross the Atlantic on a racing boat with a crew of 23 on the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race

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I was moist and cold and had not showered for more than a week. Even the inside of my sleeping bag seemed cute and my socks had a lightweight purse.

What's more, we would experience a severe storm with 70 knots / 80 mph of wind blowing 30ft waves.

However, we had hit the halfway point on Leg Two on the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race and my mind was a little sunnier at the prospect of reaching dry land again.

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Sadie Whitelocks of MailOnline Travel took part in Leg 2 of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race. Her yacht traveled from Punta del Este in Uruguay to Cape Town with a crew of 23 people

An example of some of the conditions that confronted Sadie and her crew, with waves that did not wash over the yacht. At one point, she hit a raging storm with winds of 80mph and 30ft waves

An example of some of the conditions that confronted Sadie and her crew, with waves that did not wash over the yacht. At one point, she hit a raging storm with winds of 80mph and 30ft waves

A shot of the bright Punta del Este racing yacht Sadie traveled through from Uruguay to South Africa

A shot of the bright Punta del Este racing yacht Sadie traveled through from Uruguay to South Africa

I had signed up for 3000 nautical miles from Punta del Este in Uruguay to Cape Town, crossing the unattainable Southern Atlantic in an effort to & # 39; sail & # 39; to add to my repertoire of adventurous explosions.

I was told that the challenge was not & # 39; Champagne sails & # 39; was and more than a & # 39; raw whiskey & # 39; – and that analogy turned out to be correct.

It was a hot cram with 23 of us on board the 70ft Punta del Este-sponsored yacht and we were racing against ten other boats to get to the finish.

I had undergone training for four weeks – a required requirement for the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race – but nothing could have prepared me for & # 39; the wrath of & # 39; an open ocean.

There were a limited number of box-like suitcases, which meant that Sadie and her watch team had to share these with the other watch group

There were a limited number of box-like suitcases, which meant that Sadie and her watch team had to share these with the other watch group

There were two hand pump toilets on the 70ft yacht

Sadie said after the race, her shrinking hands were a reminder of & # 39; journey she had completed

There were two hand pump toilets on the 70ft yacht (left). Sadie said after the race, her shrunken hands were a reminder of a journey she had completed (right)

I had imagined dreamy sunsets, glowing sunbeams and flocks of birds that would suck next to our ship.

Instead, for me most of the time, 50 shades of gray fell out of time with a thin spread of albatross that sometimes appeared.

At night, I imagined seeing a beautiful capital of shining stars.

But the only twinkles came from a bioluminescent squid that dipped into the water and occasionally jumped on deck.

However, being in the hands of Mother Nature and sending a desolate wash of water proved a real tension.

During my wait – we worked on shift patterns of four hours, four hours away – I often sat on the deck and was abused by the salt spray that did not admire the power of the planet.

The waves that were above me were very welcome, as we had no shower for the duration of our 16-day crossing.

The yacht was relegated to basics, with two small bathrooms covered with hand pump toilets.

One bathroom had a small mirror so we could check our tan faces.

A rare sunset during Sadie & # 39; s journey across the South Atlantic

A rare sunset during Sadie & # 39; s journey across the South Atlantic

The skipper of a Punta del Este boat, Jeronimo Santos Gonzalez, looks out to the ocean as a crew member takes to the helm

The skipper of a Punta del Este boat, Jeronimo Santos Gonzalez, looks out to the ocean as a crew member takes to the helm

Sadie said she had expected pretty basic culinary dishes at sea, but David Watkins, who wasn't responsible for making a menu booklet, had included some pretty tasty recipes. Above, a meal is served in a cabbage

Sadie said she had expected pretty basic culinary dishes at sea, but David Watkins, who wasn't responsible for making a menu booklet, had included some pretty tasty recipes. Above, a meal is served in a cabbage

To & # 39; front room of & # 39; In the bedroom there were a limited number of box-like stacks, which meant we had to share them with the other watch group.

The salon was the other public space, with a minuscule gallery in & # 39; center of & # 39; e things.

It was here that I spent a lot of time trying to dry out.

I kept my luggage to a minimum to save space.

This meant that I would recycle four pairs of underwear, re-use ones, and choose pieces of clothing that would not be saturated.

Key features of the kit included a very warm sheepskin hat by Seattle outfitter Filson, some Musto sailboats, a Mongolia cashmere scarf, a deodorant stick and several packages of wet wipes.

The lounge area on board a boat with the small galley in the center of it. The cabinets had nets to prevent items from falling out

The lounge area on board a boat with the small galley in the center of it. The cabinets had nets to prevent items from falling out

I also had three chocolate bars stacked for cases of need.

When it came to food, such as cleaning and logging duty, we took it to play to be chefs for the day that rolls out breakfast, lunch, cake and dinner for the hot crew.

To help our culinary pursuits, the kitchens aboard the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race boats are equipped with rotating stoves, which move to the rhythm of a boat to prevent pots and drum pans.

During our trip, an impressive mix of meals was put together.

I was expecting nice bites, but David Watkins, who was in charge of making a menu booklet, had some pretty complicated recipes included.

For lunch there was everything, from couscous with chorizo, mushroom peas and asparagus to macaroni cheese with bacon and fries and carrot soup, which required us to peel and dice the vegetables & # 39; by carefully turning a knife, then we & # 39; re balancing at an angle.

The hard pieces were then roasted, cooked and simmered through a sieve to make a smooth liquid.

Tea breaks with moist cakes made from packing mix kept us entertained in the meantime.

And for dinner, people came rather inventively with the assortment of things they found lurking in their net cabinets.

Sadie (left) with crewmate Kati Kaskeala (right) in the small galley area during her Chief's Day

Sadie (left) with crewmate Kati Kaskeala (right) in the small galley area during her Chief's Day

The crew members of Sadie Alejandra Alvira (left) and Mary Vaughan-Jones (right) show their Halloween-themed cakes

The crew members of Sadie Alejandra Alvira (left) and Mary Vaughan-Jones (right) show their Halloween-themed cakes

Sadie said the & # 39; feeling of relief at seeing land for the first time is something I will never forget & # 39 ;. Above was her reaction when Cape Town came close

Sadie said the & # 39; feeling of relief at seeing land for the first time is something I will never forget & # 39 ;. Above was her reaction when Cape Town came close

Antonio Palacio from Uruguay proved to be a hot word in the & # 39; galley and everyone fell silent with the coming of his very wrestling & # 39; e hand.

& # 39; What's Here? & # 39; I asked one day, trying to figure out how & # 39; t his meal tasted so good.

& # 39; Vegetarian sausages, & # 39; he replied, adding that he had found a few pots of faux meat.

Some people were less dexterous in the fridge and I remember one morning, a crewmate who tried to make scrambled eggs in a baking pan and the running liquid almost slipped over the edge as we passed through some big waves crashed.

On another occasion, the porridge was cooked and our teeth were semi-cemented together, but it all warmed up deliciously.

Another struggle was making the right amount of food for such a large group and once I cooked with my crew, we were driven to fill each one's dishes.

Having enough seconds is an essential part of racing life, especially if you burn up to 5,000 calories per day at sea.

Improvisational: Sadie uses her hat as a tee cozy on an incredible swinging stove

Improvisational: Sadie uses her hat as a tee cozy on an incredible swinging stove

Towards the end of the & # 39; s South Atlantic stint, we were refreshed with fresh fruit and thrown off our chocolate rants.

Muesli, biscuits and maple syrup were other popular picks.

The feeling of relief at seeing land for the first time is something I will never forget.

& # 39; Country Hat! & # 39; one shouted when the Table Mountain of Cape Town came into view – and there were fixed smiles all around when we triumphantly reached the coast.

Back on land, when I enjoyed the warm blast of a shower and walking on a horizontal surface, my journey on the high seas seemed like a salt-soaked dream.

But my shrinking hands and broken body served as proof that it was not a work of fiction.

The Clipper Round the World Yacht Race is certainly not Champagne sails, but a raw whiskey that promises to awaken new feelings, for better or worse.

Sadie's place on the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race was supported by musto.com, the technical clothing partner for the 2019-20 and 2021-22 editions of the event. The race is set to end in London in August 2020. Try to follow the race progress www.clipperroundtheworld.com.

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