The Japanese city of Kamakura tells tourists not to eat and walk in crowded areas

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Japanese city tells tourists not to eat and walk in crowded areas to prevent spillage from tarnishing other visitors' clothing

  • Kamakura has politely issued official ordinance asking tourists to sit down for dinner
  • It describes eating while walking as a & # 39; public nuisance & # 39; because of potential for games
  • Despite the signs, there will be no fines or fines for that fugitive request

Tourists in a Japanese city are told not to eat while walking in crowded areas to prevent other people's clothing from dyeing.

Kamakura, in the east of the country and famous for its Great Buddha statue, has politely issued official ordinance asking people to sit down while eating.

The ordinance describes eating while walking as a & # 39; public nuisance & # 39; because of the potential to waste food and comes amid tourist numbers of 60,000 a day in one area of ​​the city – the Kamakura Komachi Dori shopping area.

Tourist gather around the Big Buddha statue in Kamakura, Japan. The city has politely issued official ordinance asking people to sit down while eating in public areas

According to CNN, the neighborhoods are located to build awareness. There are no penalties for anyone who flies the request.

Norikazu Takahashi, president of & # 39; Kamakura Shopping Association, told the Japan Times: & # 39; We cannot prohibit the handling of food while walking.

& # 39; We want to make the street a place where both travelers and residents can feel good. & # 39;

For many, the signs may seem a bit overdone, but for the Japanese, they simply reinforce normal etiquette in their country, which is to sit down to eat so food can be well appreciated.

Food in the street is also a no-no in other countries.

Ordinance in Kamakura, pictured, describes eating while walking as a & # 39; public nuisance & # 39; because of the potential to throw away food

Ordinance in Kamakura, pictured, describes eating while walking as a & # 39; public nuisance & # 39; because of the potential to throw away food

Last year, tourists in Florence were warned that they could face fines of up to £ 450 for dining in & # 39; street.

Laws now prohibit snacking in four streets in the historic center of the Italian city between the hours of 12pm to 3pm and from 6am to 10pm.

Meanwhile, in Venice, each summer a group of waiting, the & # 39; angels or decorum & # 39; mentioned, tackling tourist behavior that they find unusual.

This includes eating in the street, drinking and dipping your toes or swimming in & # 39; e famous city & # 39; s channels.

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