Italian winemakers set fire to their vineyards and create a multi-layered glow across the landscape

0

Italian winemakers give the landscape a multi-faceted shine by placing hundreds of flaming torches under its vines to protect them from the coldest May temperatures in decades

  • Winemakers in South Tyrol have placed anti-frost flares under the vines to save their grapes
  • The torches – so-called smudge pots – can raise the temperature by up to three degrees
  • An Italian farmers' union warns that crops could lose millions of euros due to the cold snap

Advertisement

Winemakers in Northern Italy set their vineyards on fire – but for a very good reason.

Unusual frosty weather in the South Tyrol region is threatening to destroy grape grapes this year.

To save them, winemakers have warmed themselves up dramatically by placing hundreds of flaming torches under the vines, making the landscape look like something out of a fairy tale.

A hovering shot of the Abbazia di Novacella monastery in South Tyrol, Italy, with hundreds of torches in his vineyards that create a magical landscape

One winery that used the torch was the Abbazia di Novacella, a monastery that is among the oldest active wineries in the world.

Here, temperatures fell as low as nine degrees Celsius last week – its lowest May temperature in 32 years.

Beautiful photos leave hundreds of torches in the middle of his vines, creating a magical landscape.

Andreas Huber, a winemaker from the South Tyrol region, told Ansa: & # 39; Any more than one degree below zero and you are really in trouble. & # 39;

Temperatures dropped to minus Northern nine degrees Celsius last week - its lowest May temperature in 32 years. Pictured are the anti-frost flares like Abbazia di Novacella

Temperatures dropped to minus Northern nine degrees Celsius last week – its lowest May temperature in 32 years. Pictured are the anti-frost flares like Abbazia di Novacella

One winery said the lighting of 300 torches over one hectare of land could raise the temperature by up to three degrees

One winery said the lighting of 300 torches over one hectare of land could raise the temperature by up to three degrees

However, he added that 300 of the flares over one hectare of land could raise the temperature by three degrees – enough to save the crops.

Wine expert Emily O'Hare, who contributed to Decanter magazine and formerly the sommelier at restaurant with Michelin star The River Café, in London, told MailOnline Travel that placing torch under vines is a fairly common practice.

She said: "It's not an uncommon thing to do – in Chablis they have used similar techniques for years. They have loads of frosty frost and so will place "smudge pots" – oil burners – between rows of vines to prevent temperatures from falling into dangerously freezing temperatures that can cause great damage to young buds and noises.

& # 39; In Siena, the conversation topic is the weather – and usually it is more food oriented. But it's a real shock this May, temperatures are low – the coldest May in 60 years I've heard, and rainfall is high. Although, as one winemaker pointed out to me, about the rainfall is so high, it is rather a blessing that the temperature has remained consistently on the cooler side, at least there is no moisture, and the risk of rot that comes with it. & # 39;

Despite the vigorous efforts of winemakers, Italian farmer Coldiretti estimates that crops of millions of euros could still be destroyed because of the recent cold snap.

The Abbazia di Novacella Monastery produces 700,000 bottles of wine a year – 70 per cent of them are white wine and 30 per cent are red wine.

It currently has 14 acres of vineyards as well as 30 acres of fruit orchard.

Also belonging to the monastery are 1,700 hectares of forest and 1,000 hectares of Alpine meadows.

Advertisement

.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here